Training a Valuable Tool in Dangerous Goods Transportation

Chicago symposium to offer interactive training, address regulatory developments and the role of technology in hazmat logistics.

As a proud parent of three daughters, a grandson, and two ShihTzu pups, a July 21, 2017 Science News post caught my attention. Entitled, “Temperature, solar radiation, wind: Three parameters to predict a vehicle’s cabin air temperature,” the article reported on a University of Veterinary Medicine—Vienna study.

The online story’s summary pointed out what many of us have tragically seen on the news, “Parked vehicles can quickly become a life-threatening environment for unattended children or dogs during the summer months.” The accompanying photo of a dog alone in car with the window slightly rolled down was “worth a thousand words.”

So, what does this have to do with logistics? Quite a bit, especially when you’re talking about preventing temperature excursions of temperature-sensitive products—not only in the heat and humidity, but also in extreme cold conditions.

Now add to the scenario the transportation of dangerous goods and it’s easy to see that a better understanding of this subject would be valuable. To that end, hazardous material transport provider Labelmaster will host its 12th annual Dangerous Goods Symposium (DGS) on September 6-8 at the Drake Hotel in Chicago. 

Designed for professionals involved in the transportation of dangerous goods, the event will address regulatory updates, provide interactive training workshops and industry networking opportunities. Experts will discuss topics such as:

• Domestic and international regulatory updates

• Past, current and future regulations

• Training

• The role of technology in hazmat logistics

• Regulatory roadblocks

• Lithium battery regulations

A press release announcing the symposium noted there are more than 1.4 million dangerous goods shipments every day. Whether you’re transporting dangerous goods or your loved ones, it’s good to be armed with information that can help you better protect them.

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