Troy Center for Materials and Manufacturing Sciences Announces PPE, Medical Plastic Recycling Research

Researchers are looking into new ways to produce PPEs from polymers as well as into methods of recycling medical plastics.

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“The current pandemic has shown the crucial need to increase the nation’s production capacity in regards protective equipment for our medical professionals,” Menon says.
“The current pandemic has shown the crucial need to increase the nation’s production capacity in regards protective equipment for our medical professionals,” Menon says.

Troy University’s Center for Materials and Manufacturing Sciences announces research aimed to bolster production of personal protective equipment (PPEs) for healthcare workers and create new avenues for recycling medical plastic waste. 

The ongoing coronavirus crisis has put in stark focus the need for increased production of PPEs for medical professionals. Dr. Govind Menon, director of the Center for Materials and Manufacturing Sciences, says Troy researchers are looking at new ways to produce PPEs from polymers as a means to increase production and help prepare for future threats. 

“The current pandemic has shown the crucial need to increase the nation’s production capacity in regards protective equipment for our medical professionals,” Menon says. “At Troy, we are committing to researching new methods for producing polymer-based PPEs in preparation for future medical threats.”

In addition, the Center has started research into methods for recycling medical plastics. Healthcare facilities in the U.S. generate more than 14,000 tons of medical waste each day, with up to 25% of the amount consisting of plastic packaging or products, according to industry sources

Currently that plastic waste ends up in landfills or incinerators, according to Menon, but the Center is researching methods to recycle that waste for non-medical uses.

“Medical plastics are high-quality virgin plastics that are being incinerated for fear of contamination,” Menon says. “We believe it’s possible to recycle this plastic and remove any threat of contamination to create useful, high-grade plastics for non-medical uses. This would be a huge reduction in waste.”

Founded in 2018 with support from the National Institute of Standards and Technology, Troy’s Center for Materials and Manufacturing Sciences is a fully integrated multi-disciplinary research facility focusing on research into polymers and polymer recycling.

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